Category: Global Health

When our neurons — the principle cells of the brain — die, so do we.Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no “backup” after birth. Researchers have generally believed that their survival is determined nearly extrinsically, or by outside forces, such as the tissues and cells that neurons supply with nerve cells.

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It’s become clear that the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t going to end anytime soon. This means that we are going to have to figure out how to live, and raise our children, when seemingly every action we take carries some risk.

Youth sports can bring great benefits to children. Team sports offer opportunities for exercise, which is crucial for health, and also for socialization and learning how to be part of a community. Children need these opportunities, which are particularly lacking during the pandemic. It would be great if we could find a way for children to engage in sports during the pandemic. But as with every trip to the store or even the mailbox, there are risks involved.

To help parents understand and navigate these risks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released some information and considerations about youth sports during COVID-19.

First, which sport?

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This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at what causes revenge bedtime procrastination (a phenomenon I’m way too familiar with), the psychological toll of rude emails, why “I did by best” is a sorry (pun intended) excuse, and more.

Stay well, friends!

Don’t Fall Into the Trap of ‘Revenge Bedtime Procrastination’: Ever find yourself staying up late at night, even if you spent the entire day ticking item after item off your to-do list, even if there isn’t really anything else you need to do, and even if all your body wants to do is sleep? It’s called revenge bedtime procrastination! Journalist Daphne K. Lee describes it as “phenomenon in which people who don’t have much control over their daytime life refuse to sleep early in order to regain some sense of freedom during late night hours” and Dr. Elizabeth Yuko explains how we can stop. … Read the rest

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Yeoman Warders who have guarded the Tower of London and the Royal Crown Jewels since the reign of Henry VII face layoffs because of a lack of tourists during the pandemic.

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There’s a gap in Scott Olsen’s memory for the night of Oct. 25, 2011.

The Iraq War vet remembers leaving his tech job in the San Francisco Bay Area and taking a BART train to join an Occupy Oakland protest against economic and social inequality.

He remembers standing near protesters who faced off with Oakland police officers bristling with riot gear.

He remembers being carried away by other protesters.

But not the moment when a “bean bag” round fired from an officer’s 12-gauge shotgun crashed into the left side of his head, fracturing his skull and inflicting a near-fatal brain injury that forced him to relearn how to talk.

What happened to Olsen was not unique or isolated. Time and again over the past two decades ― from L.A. to D.C., Minneapolis to Miami ― peace officers have targeted civilian demonstrators with munitions designed to stun and stop, rather than … Read the rest

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The final seconds of Return to Earth contains one of the film’s strongest shots. The concept of the final Hawaii segment was to capture all the athletes coalescing in one place, all in one “Frozen Moment.” This required the Anthill crew to film nine professional mountain bikers riding and merging into groups before all coming together to hit one final massive jump feature to end the film. The scene was also featured in the fourth episode of Return to Earth: The Series, The Islander, when we explored our history of filming on the Hawaiian islands.

The final shot (as the riders all hit the spine feature) plays out over 45 seconds in Return to Earth and happened in approximately 11 seconds of real-time. While this was quick to capture, the whole shooting process took hundreds of man-hours of planning, building and rehearsing to make sure every one of those athletes … Read the rest

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The results show the inhibition of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in murine models with the disease reduces the neuroinflammatory process, improving the endogen response of the organism and reducing the neuronal damage and death that cause this type of dementia.

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As our society and culture become more connected through technology, the use of headphones has increased. Headphones allow people to enjoy music and have conversations from anywhere at any time. The ease of headphone use and the mobility that they afford cannot be overstated. This is particularly true currently, as our society spends more time with virtual meetings and headphones during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the convenience of headphones and the increased utility, questions about safety of use have been raised. There is such a thing as healthy headphone use; you just need to know about safe sound levels and when to take a break from headphones.

How does sound cause hearing loss?

Isn’t sound supposed to provide a tool for communication and awareness of our environment? Yes, sound is an essential mode of communication that also orients us to our environment; however, the inner ear is very sensitive to … Read the rest

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Sometimes you can’t help it. You don’t have time to address a task until the deadline date is staring you in the face. Then you work frantically to get it done!

But be honest with yourself. Is it possible you’re an 11th hour specialist, someone who has a habit of creating unnecessary, pointless crises by letting things go until the last minute?

“I work best under pressure!” is the battle cry of the crisis-maker procrastinator. You may proclaim it proudly, intimating that you have special last minute “rush to the rescue” capabilities. Or you may utter it sheepishly, realizing that any skill you have in coping with emergencies is not a special ability but a necessary evil, generated by creating the crisis in the first place.

The bottom line for both the proud and the sheepish is that no matter how much you justify your modus operandi, you can’t escape … Read the rest

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Architect Michael Murphy believes that buildings can offer far more than shelter. Considering factors both material and human, he explains how thoughtful design can make us healthier and happier.

(Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)

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